Coronavirus (COVID-19): Which neighbourhoods have the most cases?

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This blog looks at COVID-19 cases in Scotland by neighbourhood, based on data from Public Health Scotland. The data is residence-based and so refers to where a person lives.

Note: This blog will not be updated during the Scottish Parliament’s pre-election campaign period (25 March to 4 May 2021). The blog will be updated again in the week of 10 May.

How to use the map

You can zoom in and out of the map using the plus and minus signs in the top right hand corner. When you hover over an area it will bring up the number of COVID-19 cases in that area and the name of the area.

Due to the size of neighbourhoods it may be difficult to use the map on portable devices.

At time of publication there was no data available for the Western Isle or the Orkney Islands.


Number of COVID-19 cases, by Intermediate Zone, for the seven days ending 20 March 2021

Source: Public Health Scotland

While the map is helpful to see where cases are across the country, it is difficult to easily see any outliers due to the size of neighbourhoods. The following chart looks at the distribution of cases by neighbourhood by each local authority.

Cases per 100,00 by local authority and neighborhood: 7 days ending 20 March 2021

Source: Public Health Scotland

About the map and data

Please be aware that some areas are named “IZ” followed by a number. The Scottish Government have highlighted that in order to name areas, a high level of local knowledge is required which is not available centrally. On top of this there are sensitivities around naming that can cause difficulties in some areas.

In addition to this, from 26 January 2021, we have included the number and proportion of smaller areas (datazones) within the larger area (neighbourhood) which are in the 20% most deprived areas in Scotland.  Therefore, this shows us, relatively, which neighbourhoods have higher and lower concentrations of deprived areas within them.

It is worth noting that “deprived” does not just mean “poor” or “low income”. It can also mean that people may have fewer resources and opportunities, for example in health and education. Also, not everyone living in a deprived area experiences deprivation. More information on the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation can be found in this Scottish Government booklet on the SIMD 2020. 

You can find more data in the Coronavirus (COVID-19) in Scotland – latest data blog post.

Andrew Aiton, Data Visualisation Manager